Stuck in the Stars

In the ways of the man upon the Earth, I stand tall with me and myself to fight malevolence amongst the cosmos and nebulas for the continuum of the Universe. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Under a Blood Moon: 1st Total Lunar Eclipse of 2014 Wows Stargazers


  The moon took on an eerie blood-red hue early Tuesday during the first total lunar eclipse of 2014, a celestial sight that wowed potentially millions of stargazers across North and South America.
  
  The total lunar eclipse of April 15 lasted about 3.5 hours between late Monday and early Tuesday, with the Earth’s shadow slowing darkening the face of the so-called “Blood Moon” in a jaw-dropping sight for stargazers willing to stay up extra late or rise super-early for the event.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Under a Blood Moon: 1st Total Lunar Eclipse of 2014 Wows Stargazers

The moon took on an eerie blood-red hue early Tuesday during the first total lunar eclipse of 2014, a celestial sight that wowed potentially millions of stargazers across North and South America.

The total lunar eclipse of April 15 lasted about 3.5 hours between late Monday and early Tuesday, with the Earth’s shadow slowing darkening the face of the so-called “Blood Moon” in a jaw-dropping sight for stargazers willing to stay up extra late or rise super-early for the event.

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.
The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.
In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

spaceplasma:

Suppose you had a single hydrogen atom and at a particular instant plotted the position of its electron. Soon afterwards, you do the same thing, and find that it is in a new position. You have no idea how it got from the first place to the second. You keep on doing this over and over again, and gradually build up a sort of 3D map of the places that the electron is likely to be found.

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle  says - loosely - that you can’t know with certainty both where an electron is and where it’s going next. That makes it impossible to plot an orbit for an electron around a nucleus, but we have a mathematical function that describes the wave-like behavior of either one electron or a pair of electrons in an atom. This function can be used to calculate the probability of finding any electron of an atom in any specific region around the atom’s nucleus.

In the hydrogen case, the electron can be found anywhere within a spherical space surrounding the nucleus. Such a region of space is called an orbital. Orbits and orbitals sound similar, but they have quite different meanings. It is essential that you understand the difference between them. You can think of an orbital as being the region of space in which the electron lives. The GIF animation shows the probability densities for the electron of a hydrogen atom in different quantum states. These orbitals form an orthonormal basis for the wave function of the electron. These shapes are intended to describe the angular forms of regions in space where the electrons occupying the orbital are likely to be found.

(Source: goo.gl, via thescienceofreality)

baracknobama:

theres this kid in my maths class who can recite pi to 720 digits

and im there like image

(Source: baracknobama, via teenager90s)

gravitationalbeauty:

Pin by Mark R. Turner on Deep Space

“When “i” is replaced with “we” even illness becomes wellness.”

—   

Malcolm X (via amorestavivo)

This changed me.

(via losingfatfindingfit)

Good Vibes HERE

(via kushandwizdom)

(Source: nargessi, via kushandwizdom)

(Source: pasenast, via coolboyclub)

doll:

FOLLOWING BACK ALL BLOGS TIL I REACH MY GOAL XX

doll:

FOLLOWING BACK ALL BLOGS TIL I REACH MY GOAL XX

(Source: lonq)